Mills And Boon- The Andreou Marriage Arrangement

by Helen Bianchin


3.6 out of 5 based on 5 customer ratings
(5 customer reviews)

3.6 out of 5 based on 5 customer ratings
(5 customer reviews)

Description:

Loukas Andreou: a force to be reckoned with in business…and in the bedroom, as rumor has it. The same man who, to Alesha Karsouli’s horror, she must marry according to the terms of her father’s will. Alesha reluctantly concedes to a paper marriage where she and Loukas will fulfill social obligations yet lead separate lives. But Loukas needs more…a wife who is doting in public. And the only way to make that arrangement appear authentic is if she’s his willing bride “in private.”..

184
English
Genre, Romance

About The Author

Helen Bianchin was encouraged by a friend to write her own romance novel and she hasn’t stopped writing since! Helen’s interests include a love of reading, going to the movies, and watching selected television programs. She also enjoys catching up with friends, usually over a long lunch! A lover of animals, especially cats, she owns two beautiful Birmans. Helen lives in Australia with her husband. Their three children and four grandchildren live close by.


Average Reader Rating

3.6 out of 5 based on 5 customer ratings

Reader Reviews

5 reviews for Mills And Boon- The Andreou Marriage Arrangement

  1. 3 out of 5

    “Good Reading”

  2. 4 out of 5

    I really liked this book and have read it four or five times since its publication. The thing that I find interesting about this author’s books is that all of the heroines seem to be domestic abuse victims, to varying degrees. This one was no different. The ex was a scumbag who beat her badly enough to land her in the hospital. Loukas, the new husband, finds out about it while they are being intimate when he feels the scars and the healed broken ribs. The story is very sweet in that you watch the progression of their relationship and the healing of Alecia. I’ve enjoyed everything I’ve read by this author. Perhaps you will enjoy this one too.

  3. 3 out of 5

    This is the first review I have ever written about a book, but I’m doing it because the other reviewers got it WRONG. I do not agree that this book rates 5 stars. Not even close. It was boring. Too tame. Most of the dialogue was internal. I like my romances to have a bit more angst. More passion! More drama! I want the H to be an arrogant ass and act like a jerk so that he can grovel at the end. This story just kind of flowed along ever so gently, and then they are in love? What? And the abusive ex husband? Obviously, he seemed to play a major part in the h’s feelings about her new marriage, but even then the new husband’s dealings with her and her trauma seem to just be sort of “…”. So H ruins the ex financially. It’s all done behind the scenes, and then he tells the h about it when it’s over. Again, no drama. I can sum up this book in one word… “blah”. I have already deleted it from my Kindle. I do not recommend

  4. 4 out of 5

    This story was enough to make me understand why guys don’t get our fascination with chick lit. Bianchin happens to have written one of my favorite chick lit works, Christmas Marriage Ultimatim, put out in 2004. It’s short, evocative, with beautifully drawn scenes and character–a wide variety of them. Her language is more polished than you’d expect to find in Harlequins these days, and I have to say, whoever converts Harlequins to digital format does an exceptional job. Both books feature uber alpha males and traumatized females. The males must win their heroines’ trust, and that process is the bulk of the book.Comparing the two works, I feel Andreou is less convincing. We don’t get much sense of his personality, other than he’s a busy man with a keen sense of vengeance. He’s in the boardroom or the bedroom, or he’s staring at the lady. The heroines of both books are strong and determined. Bianchin is fond of tossing out ‘sentences’ of descriptive language which have no beginning or end. They make sense only because they follow a previous sentence or question and embellish the action. The overall effect is lush, rich in description, but the action and plot are slow. So, unlike the earlier work, this Bianchin will not likely be one of my frequent rereads. It is lovely to watch the principal characters come together, but their extreme about face doesn’t ring true in the end.

  5. 4 out of 5

    This story was enough to make me understand why guys don’t get our fascination with chick lit. Bianchin happens to have written one of my favorite chick lit works, Christmas Marriage Ultimatim, put out in 2004. It’s short, evocative, with beautifully drawn scenes and character–a wide variety of them. Her language is more polished than you’d expect to find in Harlequins these days, and I have to say, whoever converts Harlequins to digital format does an exceptional job. Both books feature uber alpha males and traumatized females. The males must win their heroines’ trust, and that process is the bulk of the book.Comparing the two works, I feel Andreou is less convincing. We don’t get much sense of his personality, other than he’s a busy man with a keen sense of vengeance. He’s in the boardroom or the bedroom, or he’s staring at the lady. The heroines of both books are strong and determined. Bianchin is fond of tossing out ‘sentences’ of descriptive language which have no beginning or end. They make sense only because they follow a previous sentence or question and embellish the action. The overall effect is lush, rich in description, but the action and plot are slow. So, unlike the earlier work, this Bianchin will not likely be one of my frequent rereads. It is lovely to watch the principal characters come together, but their extreme about face doesn’t ring true in the end.

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